How To Set The Perfect Environment For Making Sales

Posted by Haley Whisennand on Mar 16, 2017 9:47:15 AM

How To Set The Perfect Environment For Making Sales

Do you sometimes feel there are hundreds of shops just like yours? That your sales conversion rate each day is simply a matter of luck? And that if only more customers had dropped by, you could have sold way more?

Well, the truth is that it’s way more up to you than you think. There are many ways to attract customers and this includes definite actions you can take to create just the right environment.  First, you want to get more customers to step into your store and next you want to create the right atmosphere for sales to happen. Recognize that there are often psychological or imaginary barriers to people making buying decisions.

To help you deal with these imaginary barriers I have drawn up a list of solutions, and so increase your sales.

Dress right for the part
Current research supports the correlation between the way you dress and what you represent. As a representative of your products, you would need to dress according to your brand. It may sound strange, but your physical appearance is a sure give away to your customers about how you feel about your product or service.  A neat, classy look is a sure way to project the image you’re trying to sell to your customer – that of a successful business person – and this will also help you to move around with greater more confidence.

Tip for tomorrow morningGet yourself a smart new jacket to test your success rate in sales. You’ll be amazed at the results.

Scent Your Space
Many store owners already understand the power of scents as a way to invite people to their shops and even particular items. It’s thought to work so well because the sense of smell is most directly connected to the parts of the brain responsible for processing emotions. So if you feel you’re not doing your best in this particular area, think about spicing things up a little –  and see the amazing results for your business.

Tip for tomorrow morning
Go and buy your store’s hallmark fragrance to create the right mood. If it works for giants like Abercrombie & Fitch, Victoria’s Secret or The Body Shop, it will surely work for you.

Smart Organizing
Although you have your preferences about where to place your best selling products, there is a definite science to placing products in retail stores. But that’s not enough. Do your customers have a place to experiment with the product? Can they feel, touch and try it out? Do you have a demo stand? These are some of the aspects you need to think about while (re)organizing your store.

Tip for tomorrow morningArrive at your store 15 minutes earlier just to think what products you would like to have and where – from the customer’s perspective. Allow your thoughts to freewheel before you take your next step.

Play The Right Music
It’s always important to keep yourself and your staff bright and on the go. However, your favorite upbeat music might not lead to the results you were hoping for with your target customers. Research has shown that consumers shop longer and make more purchases when they’re exposed to the right musical match. For instance, if you’re selling upscale products, the best choice is probably classical or jazz.

Tip for tomorrow morningStart trying out the many music platforms out there to select the vibes you want for your store. The enhanced mood will inevitably generate sales.


Use Your Free Time
It’s not always about what you do; sometimes it’s about what you don’t do. Instead of interacting with your smartphone while there’s no traffic in your store, why not start taking advantage of this time to re-organize or rearrange your products, learn more about your products and try them out. This way your customers will never surprise you with questions you can’t answer or descend on you when you’re not ready.

Tip for tomorrow morning
Start writing your business plan for next year. Just thinking about this topic will make your creativity wheel spin and trigger some innovative ideas.

 

 

Topics: Specialty Retail